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Calling all women!

BJJ is the perfect martial art for women to learn because it doesn’t rely on physical attributes. You don’t need big muscles, or lots of fitness to make it work.

The reason is because it’s not your muscles that make Jiu Jitsu work. When you focus on your skeleton you can find all the leverage and strength you need to practice the techniques.

Ladies, jiu jitsu was made for you too. 

With Jiu Jitsu you no longer need to feel defenseless against anyone, fearful of your safety, or scared of being yourself in confrontation.

When you do BJJ, you learn self defense, which means you are more aware of your surroundings and have more ability to keep yourself safe in dangerous situations.

It’s how the women of our community can rise from feeling scared and overwhelmed to being empowered and free and ready to live to your fullest potential.

 

But first, you need to get started. Start now by booking your free trial!

 

via higherjiujitsu.com.au

Gracie Girls

The Gracie Girls last Saturday was a great success with an unexpected big turn up at Gracie Humaita Central Coast. 

Professor Tiago Ferreira spoiled the girls with a wonderful class showing Self- Defense techniques followed by an Open Mat and finishing with a barbecue feast cooked by him!

Anne Soares, the Gracie Girls official organizer said on the Gracie Girls Instagram page @graciegirlsaustralia: ” It was great to meet all the Girls from the Central Coast and even better to see that the numbers have grown significantly from last year. Today was special having purple, blue and white belts sharing the Mat and such a ranges of  ages. The future looks bright. Still on a high and feeling so blessed to have such a awesome association Gracie Humaita Australia committed to growing our epic female team”

Thanks for all the girls who made their way up to Central Coast! Without you the Gracie Girls wouldn’t be growing solid and strong.

Thanks Gracie Central Coast for hosting the event last weekend and thanks to all the Academies in the Association that hosted,supported and collaborate with the Program.

This year has been amazing for our girls. We started the Gracie Girls 2018 schedule with Master Royler Gracie hosting the first event at Gracie Sydney in Alexandria with a group of over 60 women and girls! And we are finishing with Australian UFC Champion Robert Whittaker hosting the Gracie Girls at Gracie Smeaton Grange on November the 10th!

Session starts at 1pm with with Self -Defence, drilling and Open Mat followed by a delicious brazilian BBQ prepared by @barbicrew. All belts and ages are welcome.

The event is exclusive to the Gracie Humaita Australia Members. If you would like more information about how to become a member please contact the branch near you.

We can’t wait to train and celebrate with all our sisters next month!

 

Gracie Girls at Miranda

Gracie Sydney’s Female Team is hosting their next Association Open Mat, on Saturday, September 8th from 12:30pm at Gracie Humaita Miranda– 2/30 Gibbs Street.
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It`s been over a year since this rotating Open Mat for the women of our association visits a different gym each month.
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All females in our association are welcome to attend these open mats. All ages and all experience levels! Let’s go girls!
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For more information and to stay up to date with our Gracie Girls visit our Facebook page here.
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And if you still don`t train BJJ start now by booking your free trial!

Gracie Girls at Northern Beaches

Gracie Sydney’s Female Team is hosting their next Association Open Mat, on Saturday, August 11th from 10am at Gracie Humaita Mona Vale– 2/84 Darley St.
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This rotating Open Mat for the women of our association visits a different gym each month. All females in our association are welcome to attend these open mats. All ages and all experience levels!
Let’s go girls!
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For more information and to stay up to date with our Gracie Girls visit our Facebook page here.
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And if you still don`t train BJJ start now by booking your free trial!
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2018 NSW State Championship

Amazing weekend for our Gracie Sydney Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (BJJ) Team at the NSW State Championships. We would like to thank for the efforts of our competitors, family, friends, coaches, and professors for all those medals from our Kids, Teens, Adults, and Women who competed from the Gracie Humaita Association. We could not be prouder of all of our Team. Way to rock the NSW State Championships everyone! There are some new champs in town…

If you missed this one or are hungry for the fun of BJJ competition again, don’t worry. Come talk to one of our coaches about next tournaments coming up.

Gracie Girls at Bankstown

Another great  Gracie Girls gathering!

This time at Gracie Humaita in Bankstown with lots of fun, learns and rolls.

Great turn out! Girls from different gyms are becoming a really big family with strong bonds.

Many thanks to Sami for the class, support and delicious feast!

Next meeting @ Gracie Balmain on the 14th of July.

OSS

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How a UFC Champion Can Help a Footy Player into His Football Career?

*post extract from nrl.com

Rookie NSW No.9 Damien Cook is tipped to breathe new life into the Blues ruck play after personal wrestling sessions with Rob ‘The Reaper’ Whittaker helped power him into the Origin arena.

Cook’s speed as a former champion beach sprinter has caught the collective eye of the rugby league world this season, but it’s the extra starch in his defence that got him across the line as hooker for next Wednesday’s series opener at the MCG.

Targeting an 80-minute role at the Rabbitohs in the pre-season but knowing his 88-kilo frame would have opposition forwards sizing him up as cannon fodder, Cook sought out South Sydney’s wrestling and Gracie Humaita Australia coach Alex Prates for extra work over the summer.

Also on Prates’ roll call at the Gracie Sydney Jiu Jitsu, Alexandria gym is current middleweight UFC champ Whittaker, who also doubles as a diehard Rabbitohs fan.

Which meant Cook was tussling on the mat with the real deal soon enough.

“I thought (Whittaker) wasn’t going to be there but when I turned up he was wrestling with all the young kids as well,” Cook said.

“He understands what he’s been through to get to where he is, but it was interesting to roll around and wrestle with a UFC champ.

“There were a couple of games where it was a ‘king of the middle’ sort of thing. If you won, you stayed on.

“Not that I went any good against him, I didn’t beat him. He had it over most of the boys… I thought it was going to be like wrestling sessions for footy, but it was more the jujitsu style of session.

“It’s very hard and credit to those boys who do that sport and get in to the ring.”

Whittaker squares up for his first title defence against Cuban Yoel Romero next Sunday in Chicago, while four days earlier Cook will stare down a Queensland pack featuring man mountains Dylan Napa (113 kilos), Josh Papalii (112) and Coen Hess (110).

All year Cook has been picked out by rival NRL forward packs, to the tune of 510 tackles – more than any other player in the Telstra premiership – at 42.5 a game.

That workload bodes well considering Blues predecessor Nathan Peats, as honest a toiler in the middle as they come, churned through a series high 150 tackles last year.

Cook’s point of difference in the middle is his running around the ruck, but long before claiming the NSW No.9 jumper, the 26-year-old identified his work without the ball as the key to an 80-minute performance.

One he’s happy to replicate if needed by coach Brad Fittler, given bench utility Tyrone Peachey can cover backline and back-row positions as well as the hooking duties.

“I like to keep improving all parts of my game and defence was a big one of mine,” Cook said.

“Being in the middle and getting a lot of traffic, if I did want to improve my game and play the 80 minutes I needed to make sure my defence was improved from the past.

“Those extra little wrestling sessions, I can say they’re paying off.

“Obviously it’s a different game when you hear from all the past players. I guess I won’t understand that until I actually play.

“I know it’s different at club level but I have been playing the 80 minutes all year, so if that’s what I’ve got to do, I’m more than happy to do that job.

“We haven’t really spoken about that yet.”

Kids Grading at Gracie Jiu-Jitsu Alexandria

Great day at Gracie Humaita Sydney Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (BJJ), we had over 50 Kids graduating. It was great to see that our legendary Kids Program is delivering awesome results and all our students did really well during the exam.

The Gracie Humaita Kids Grading happens twice a year and it is based on the techniques that are taught through the year by our coaches at the Academy. The kids eligible for Grading are chosen by their performance in class, attendance and attitude towards their coaches and family.

Jiu Jitsu is a great form to educate our youth, and it can help kids to stand up against bullies.

Congratulations to all new graduates, coaches and instructors.

5 Reasons Why Women Should Train Jiu Jitsu (That Aren’t For Self Defense)

 

1. It teaches you to love your body for what it can do rather than for what it looks like.

Both genders deal with the frustration of not having the “perfect” body, but the numbers are clear that women are much more likely to suffer from an eating disorder than men are in their lifetime.

Blame it on the media, society, whatever you’d like, but it’s clear that many women live their lives focusing on how small their waist is or how big their bust is or how their body doesn’t look like that body.

Jiu jitsu erases a lot of those insecurities by showing you all the awesome things your body can do. Do you have any idea how cool it is to choke someone out with the help of the thunder thighs you once hated? Do you know what it feels like to find out that you have ridiculously flexible shoulders that make you virtually un-kimura-able?

Jiu jitsu will show you, and it’s a lot more satisfying than any number that could show up on the scale. As an added bonus, all that exercise will get you closer to the hot bod you’ve always wanted, but by the time you make it there, you’ll be way more invested in your abilities than your appearance.

2. You don’t need to be big and strong to be good at it.

Yes, there are lots of women who are stronger, heavier, or taller than lots of men, but the vast majority of us are not. It can be really intimidating to walk into a martial arts gym and see really fit dudes beating the crap out of each other, but jiu-jitsu allows anyone to beat the crap out of anyone else. Isn’t that beautiful?

A lot of my non-BJJ friends think I’m lying when I tell them that I, a girl who is 5’2” on a tall day, can submit people who are literally twice my weight, but jiu-jitsu is all about technique overcoming brute strength. You don’t need to be a former championship wrestler or a beefed-up weightlifter to dominate your opponent. While that’s certainly good from a self-defense viewpoint, it’s also great for those of us who have lived our lives thinking that only large, muscly dudes can be successful in contact sports.

3. The sisterhood is like no other.

The people you train with in jiu jitsu are bound to become your non-biological family. It’s hard not to become close with someone when you’re sweating all over each other and place your safety in each other’s hands.

College sororities ain’t got nothin’ on the sisterly bonds that form on the mat.

Because there are so few women in jiu-jitsu, the closeness that forms between jiujiteiras is even stronger than most friendships that are created in the gym. It’s rare to find women who are into what is unarguably a very masculine sport, and there’s something about the struggles of being female in a sea of testosterone that tends to bring women together.

It’s not just the ladies in your own gym that will grow to be your sisters, either. You’ll form an instant connection with female BJJ practitioners from other gyms and even the ones you compete against in tournaments.

Women in jiu-jitsu don’t tear each other down, they lift each other up – sometimes literally, if they can get the leverage just right.

4. It smashes ideas about what a woman “should” or “shouldn’t” do.

I’m not the type who burns bras (those things are expensive), but my blood pressure does go up a little every time I hear someone restrict an activity or behavior to a specific gender.

It blows my freaking mind that in the year 2016, women all across the globe are still being told either by the law or by society that regardless of their physical capabilities, they can’t or shouldn’t do certain activities that are traditionally “masculine.”

Jiu-jitsu is a giant middle finger to every time someone has scolded you for being unladylike or tried to put you in your “place” as a woman.

On the mats, everyone is equal; there is no gender. You will get your butt handed to you just as much as the men do, and you’ll also dish out a fair bit of butt-handing yourself.

As an added bonus, most of the men I’ve been lucky enough to meet in jiu-jitsu are also all about gender equality. Some of the newer guys might be weird about rolling with women, but those who have been around for a while will generally be good about treating you just as they would treat a man your size.

Whether or not you actively label yourself a feminist, gender equality should be something that we work towards all over the world. And luckily, jiu-jitsu is something that is practiced all over the world.

5. It makes you a positive role model for younger girls.

Throughout her childhood, a little girl will encounter all kinds of women that she will potentially look up to. When you’re a woman who does jiu-jitsu, you’re providing her with a role model who practices healthy habits, is disciplined, and can handle herself.

Jiu jitsu comes with plenty of benefits, and when you have a daughter, a niece, or any other young lady who wants to be you when she grows up, you pass on a lot of those benefits to her just by showing her what you do. You can give that little girl a head start on loving herself and making friends who genuinely care about her well-being.

Who knows? You might even convince her to get an early start on training!

While all of these are also great reasons for men to train BJJ as well, I know first-hand how intimidating it can be as a girl to take your first jiu-jitsu class surrounded by a bunch of tough dudes.

If you’re a woman facing the same situation, don’t back out due to fear. Jiu-jitsu has made me a better human being since I started, but more specifically, it’s made me more capable of facing the challenges that women are subjected to on a daily basis.

Whether you’re motivated by self defense or something completely different, it’s never a bad idea to put on that gi and take your first steps on an unforgettable journey.